SLC White Party: A Night at the Moulin Blanc – Utah Arts Alliance

UAA-WhiteParty-Low-01

Poster Design by Todd Powelson

The SLC White Party, hosted by the Utah Arts Alliance, will be an evening to remember. Here is a description of what all is planned:

The 12th Annual White Party is this month! What is the White Party? Think all WHITE dress code: tuxedos, top hats, ball gowns, and all sorts of fun costumes. What can YOU do with white? This year’s theme is Moulin Blanc. We are channeling Parisian bohemian performance and style this year such as Moulin Rouge in its heyday! This is one of the most anticipated events for those in the know in Salt Lake City for 12 years running. Enjoy live performances, live music, cabaret, dancing, drinks, art, and much more. $30.00 at the door, ($21.00 pre-sale)—all proceeds benefit Utah Arts Alliance programs.

SLC Arts Hub
663 west 100 south, SLC, UT
January 26th, Doors open at 9pm (21+ event)

facebook.com | Event
utaharts.org
Ticket info: utaharts.ticketbud.com/slc-white-party-moulin-blanc

Check it out, I also did the poster illustration and design for this year’s event, shown at the top of this post. Fun fun!

Picasso’s Parade

“Curtain for the Ballet Parade” -1917

In 1917 Picasso did some set and costume design for the Jean Cocteau’s ballet Parade. Picasso created the curtain above, along with the cardboard cubist costumes below. Picasso hasn’t been on the ArtDuh homepage for a while, and I was thinking about his costume design today for some reason, so it seemed like a good time to post these images. Enjoy!

Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty

I should add a disclaimer before I even start this post… if you know me, you probably know I am not personally very fashion conscious. That is to say, I appreciate fashion, and love many of the fashion designers that I have met over the years. I have to give Anna a whole lot of credit too, and the people and ideas she has introduced me to, because they have opened my eyes to what is possible. Unfortunately, I still don’t give what I wear or how I look a lot of thought. This is a shortcoming, because there is a whole lot of power in presentation, and costume is also a powerful form of creation and self-expression. To be honest, I’d like to dress a whole lot more extravagantly, and I know I’d enjoy the hell out of it. But, for now at least, I will just appreciate and applaud fashion and costume on other people.

I know I am late to the party, and I also know I didn’t see the work in person, but I just came across photos of Alexander McQueen’s show Savage Beauty. I love what he created. The characters that he made are incredible, and I am in awe of the craftsmanship. I won’t even try to describe his work, but will instead post some photos, provide a few links, and hope you enjoy these photos of his work as much as I have…

blog.metmuseum.org | alexandermcqueen
yalepress.yale.edu | Savage Beauty
alexandermcqueen.com
en.wikipedia.org | Alexander_McQueen

   
   
   
   
   
   

Just Add Costume for an Instant Sex Symbol

While in Santa Fe about a week ago we saw a photography show. The artist went to Japan, met a young geisha and took her photo day after day, year after year. I liked the photos, though the Photoshop work was maybe a little too obvious, because of the costumes, the make-up, the effort that goes into being a geisha. My favorite photos showed the blurry line where real skin is exposed beneath the make-up, ear lobes with dabs of misplaced make-up, make up blurring into hair growth patterns, reality meeting fantasy.

That’s why I continue to follow the art of the geisha, and its really why I belly dance. A reviewer from Santa Fe’s monthly magazine, “THE,” refers to it as an “intentional departure from reality.” Take an ordinary girl or woman, who may have been scrubbing a toilet or changing a diaper 15 minutes ago, add makeup, hair, costume and you have an instant symbol of sex and culture. For me, it’s all about the transformation from human reality to utter work of mortal art.

And yes, after the geisha wipes off the white war paint and hang her costumes, she, is back at work washing dishes and paying the power bill, all the while drawing her next costume with her mind’s eye.