1913 Armory Show

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"Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2" by Marcel Duchamp, 1912

“Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2″ by Duchamp, 1912

If you have an interest in early 20th Century art or follow art history news you probably know that we just passed the 100 year anniversary of the 1913 Armory Show, a.k.a. 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art. It is called the Armory show because the exhibit was first held in the U.S. Coast Guard armories in New York, although it later traveled to Chicago and Boston.

The 1913 Armory Show was really the first large scale exhibit of Modern Art in America. Although there were a number of Americans who had their work included in the show, it was probably the first time most attendees were introduced to the new artwork being created in Europe. Artists like Picasso, BraqueMatisse, Cezanne, Duchamp, Gauguin, Leger, Hopper, Bellows, Goya, Seurat, Derain, Van Gogh… and so many others as well, with more than 300 artists.

"Portrait of Mlle Pogany" by  Constantin Brancusi, 1912

“Portrait of Mlle Pogany” by Brancusi, 1912

This show was a powerhouse, and it must have been so impressive to see. Without a doubt, it changed the artistic style of many American artists and the direction of American art.

100 years ago… I would love to have been there.

artsy.net/armoryshow1913

armoryshow.si.edu

nytimes.com | Armory Show

"The Blue Nude" by Henri Matisse, 1907

“The Blue Nude” by Henri Matisse, 1907

New Works – Anthony Granato

AnthonyGranato

Anthony Granato’s upcoming show at the Utah Arts Alliance (Main Street) Gallery will be a great show, so check it out!

anthonygranato.com
facebook.com | Event

Utah Arts Alliance Gallery
127 South Main Street, SLC, UT

Gallery Stroll Reception – Friday January 18th, 6 to 9 p.m., 2013

Picasso’s Parade

“Curtain for the Ballet Parade” -1917

In 1917 Picasso did some set and costume design for the Jean Cocteau’s ballet Parade. Picasso created the curtain above, along with the cardboard cubist costumes below. Picasso hasn’t been on the ArtDuh homepage for a while, and I was thinking about his costume design today for some reason, so it seemed like a good time to post these images. Enjoy!

P@ Perry

I enjoy looking at Pat Perry’s artwork. I especially like how he superimposes nature and architecture over people in his super detailed drawings.

Recently I was on his website and noticed a journal that he made while working on a residency in Alaska at the Katmai National Park. Its a great snapshot of his time up there. I also enjoyed looking through his Process links as well, and all of his artwork really.

Good stuff!

patperry.net

facebook.com | Pat-Perry-Art

TurningArt

“Raven” by Todd Powelson

Check it out… maybe you already know about TurningArt, but I really like their business model. It seems like a great new and modern way to discover new artists, and you’re even able to hang prints of those artists in your home with a monthly subscription. If you find that you like the print, you’re even able to buy the original from the artist.

If you’re an artist, its a good way to help find a larger audience. I’ve been a member and have posted my work for a few months now, and I’ve found everyone involved to be very supportive and helpful. They’ve gone out of their way to help get as many people looking at my work as possible, and the way they do it is very new and unique.

Take a look at what I have available in my TurningArt gallery, try it out, and hang it in your home :)

turningart.com/artists/artist-todd-powelson

Art and Magick of Austin Osman Spare

The soul is the ancestral animals. The body is their knowledge.

- Austin Osman Spare

Austin Osman Spare was a magician and artist whose work and theories are very interesting to me because of the way he blends the two and finds a certain power there. He is definitely attracted to and influenced by the Symbolist painters of the ninteenth century, but Spare takes it to an even more personal level. He was born in Yorkshire, but moved to London at a young age. Trained as a painter and draftsman, he also worked as an illustrator and book-plate designer. Like a lot of his contemporaries, Spare became interested in Theosophy, and that was probably where his quest for occult knowledge began. He had a number of exhibitions in England, which were all well received, up to a point. There was a backlash, and some people thought his artwork was just too bizarre and unhealthy, as some people always do. Spare also began to publish his own books and grimoires. I first became familiar with Spare’s work through my interest in Surrealism, because there is a very strong and profound overlap, although I think that his theories and ideas developed independently.

Although I won’t go into it much here I am very interested in his ideas, philosophy, and writings. Artistically, his line work can’t be beat. I like most of his work, but am especially drawn to his automatic drawings and sigils. The way he blends text with imagery is very interesting, and his bookplates are exceptional.

The means used and the way it happens are simple, the inverse of scientific. I use a formula, created by instinctive guess and *arbitrarily* formed, not evolved by hypothesis and experiment. The law of sorcery is its own law, using sympathetic symbols.

- Austin Osman Spare

hermetic.com/spare